Fz8 horsepower and torque relationship

Yamaha FZ8 and FAZER8 - Wikipedia

Yamaha® FZ8 DOES IT ALL AMAZINGLY WELL This bike simply excels, the perfect power curve and torquey performance character for this category. . The engine is designed to provide excellent power and superior low-end torque. Yamaha® FZ8 DOES IT ALL AMAZINGLY WELL This bike simply excels, deliver the perfect power curve and torquey performance character for this category. . The FZ's in-line 3-cylinder engine provides linear torque development. While the engine produces less peak power than Yamaha's cc Smooth, powerful, and what feels like never-ending torque. of the FZ, finding its attractive taper-style bar positioned slightly higher in relation to the seat.

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Yamaha FZ8 and FAZER8

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Implicit in that suggestion is the belief that a "better" oil pump has higher pumping efficiency, and can, therefore, deliver the required flow at the required pressure while consuming less power from the crankshaft to do so. While that is technically true, the magnitude of the improvement number is surprisingly small. How much power does it take to drive a pump delivering a known flow at a known pressure? We have already shown that power is work per unit time, and we will stick with good old American units for the time being foot-pounds per minute and inch-pounds per minute.

Since flow is more freqently given in gallons per minute, and since it is well known that there are cubic inches in a gallon, then: Since, as explained above, 1 HP is 33, foot-pounds of work per minute, multiplying that number by 12 produces the number of inch-pounds of work per minute in one HPDividingby gives the units-conversion factor of Therefore, the simple equation is: When the equation is modified to include pump efficiency, it becomes: So suppose your all-aluminum V8 engine requires 10 GPM at 50 psi.

The oil pump will have been sized to maintain some preferred level of oil pressure at idle when the engine and oil are hot, so the pump will have far more capacity than is required to maintain the 10 GPM at 50 psi at operating speed. That's what the "relief" valve does: It is actually pumping roughly 50 GPM 10 of which goes through the engine, and the remaining 40 goes through the relief valve at 50 psi.

The power to drive that pressure pump stage is: That pump at the same flow and pressure will consume: General Observations In order to design an engine for a particular application, it is helpful to plot out the optimal power curve for that specific application, then from that design information, determine the torque curve which is required to produce the desired power curve.

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By evaluating the torque requirements against realistic BMEP values you can determine the reasonableness of the target power curve. Typically, the torque peak will occur at a substantially lower RPM than the power peak. For a race engine, it is often beneficial within the boundary conditions of the application to operate the engine well beyond the power peak, in order to produce the maximum average power within a required RPM band.

However, for an engine which operates in a relatively narrow RPM band, such as an aircraft engine, it is generally a requirement that the engine produce maximum power at the maximum RPM. That requires the torque peak to be fairly close to the maximum RPM. For an aircraft engine, you typically design the torque curve to peak at the normal cruise setting and stay flat up to maximum RPM.

That positioning of the torque curve would allow the engine to produce significantly more power if it could operate at a higher RPM, but the goal is to optimize the performance within the operating range. An example of that concept is shown Figure 3 below. The three dashed lines represent three different torque curves, each having exactly the same shape and torque values, but with the peak torque values located at different RPM values.

The solid lines show the power produced by the torque curves of the same color. Again, moving the same torque curve to the right another RPM blue, lb-ft torque peak at RPM causes the power to peak at about HP at RPM Using the black curves as an example, note that the engine produces HP at both and RPM, which means the engine can do the same amount of work per unit time power at as it can at The RPM band within which the engine produces its peak torque is limited.

You can tailor an engine to have a high peak torque with a very narrow band, or a lower peak torque value over a wider band. Those characteristics are usually dictated by the parameters of the application for which the engine is intended.

An example of that is shown in Figure 4 below. It is the same as the graph in Figure 3 aboveEXCEPT, the blue torque curve has been altered as shown by the green line so that it doesn't drop off as quickly.

Note how that causes the green power line to increase well beyond the torque peak.